A River Kent Ramble.

Start. Natland.

Route. Natland - Hawes Lane - Hawes Bridge - Low Park Caravan Site - Nannypie Lane - Wilson Place - Well Heads Lane - Sedgwick - Canal - Natland.

Notes. Lots of rain last night and this morning, with lots more to come later today. I arrived home from work and curiosity got the best of me. Down to the banks of the swollen River Kent I went, little did I know while storms raged in the upper and lower Kent Valley I would be walking in some of the most wonderful light imaginable, a photographers paradise, unfortunately I'm not a very good photographer.

My afternoon started in Natland as the last of the showers disappeared over The Helm. From the village green I made my way down Hawes Lane crossing the canal before descending to Hawes Bridge. I crossed the bridge ignoring the private sign on the gate to enter Hawes Wood. On a muddy path I picked my way along the banks of the river before exiting the woods over a stone stile. Striding out through fields on good paths I soon reached an old mill race, the path I followed ran between the river and race until it entered the ruins of New Sedgwick Gunpowder Works, better known as Low Park Caravan Site. I exited the site onto Nannypie Lane where a finger post pointed over a footbridge, I crossed to reach Wilson Place.

With tarmac under foot I carried on down stream turning left at the first road junction. Well Heads Lane lead up to Sedgwick where a fine set of steps leads up the side of an equally fine aqueduct to access the Kendal to Lancaster Canal. I then headed north along the disused canal passing Horse Park Bridge before entering Larkrigg Spring Wood, at the other side of the woods Larkrigg Hall Bridge, I crossed the bridge to follow a way marked bridle way back to Natland.

view route map.

home.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Between the dry stone walls in Hawes Lane views to Kendal Fell.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Rising above Natland, The Helm.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Another view to The Helm above Natland.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Try as I might I couldn't get the exposure right on this shot, this is a good one you ought to see the bad ones.

A River Kemt Ramble.

A swollen River Kent at Hawes Bridge.

A River Kemt Ramble.

North upstream, seen from the entrance to the gorge, usually the river drops ten foot at this point.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Feeder stream once supplied power to drive the waterwheel at the New Sedgwick Gunpowder Works.

A River Kemt Ramble.

The river's certainly in a hurry to get to the sea today, rapids above Robin Hoods Island.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Scattered through the woods (now the Low Park Caravan Site) the impressive remains of the New Sedgwick Gunpowder Works, looking to the Wheel House, where a water wheel once powered the grinding stones that ground locally produced charcoal, an essential part of the gunpowder cocktail.

A River Kemt Ramble.

The footbridge leading to Wilson Place, or Nannypie Lane depending on which direction you're walking.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Low Park Wood as seen from the footbridge.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Wonderful golden glow on Robin Hoods Wood.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Viewing the footbridge from near Wilson Place.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Sheep graze on high pastures near Sedgwick, just out of interest I'm now walking up Well Heads Lane en route to Sedgwick, the road was once a tramway gingerly carrying gunpowder from the works by the river to be loaded onto canal boats at Sedgwick.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Looking to Sedgwick House, built by the Wakefield family, owners of a substantial share of the gunpowder industry on the banks of the River Kent, now private housing.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Another storm passes close by.

A River Kemt Ramble.

West over the Kent Valley.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Entering Sedgwick, the storm missed me by a field and a half, cars passing me still have wipers switched on, I'm still in a t-shirt.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Sedgwick Aquaduct, built in 1877-79, the aquaduct that nearly wasn't? The original plan was to run the line of the canal along the route of the present day West Coast Railway, avoiding the expense of tunneling under the hill at Hincaster. It was decided to take it through Sedgwick to service the village and the lucrative gunpowder industry on the banks of the River Kent.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Eerie light over Sedgwick, seen from high above the road, the aquaduct certainly makes a fine view point.

A River Kemt Ramble.

A stunning sky seen from Horse Park Bridge.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Looking in the same direction from further along the path.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Larkrigg Spring Wood.

A River Kemt Ramble.

On the bridle way above Larkrigg Hall Bridge, the small insignificant grey bump above the trees is Arnside Knott.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Scout Scar seen over the flooded fields belonging to Larkrigg Hall.

A River Kemt Ramble.

Built by George Webster 1822-1827 The Church of St Mark's, Natland.

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